Any type of trauma to the brain that disrupts its function is considered a traumatic brain injury, and even a mild concussion counts. Because the brain is such a complex organ, no two concussions are the same, no matter how similar the circumstances, and the outcomes could be radically different. At Lucido & Manzella, P.C., in Michigan, we have helped many people who suffered a TBI because of the negligent or violent acts of another to seek justice for their injuries.

According to the Mayo Clinic, some people develop post-concussion syndrome, although researchers have not been able to predict who may develop it. The severity of the injury does not appear to be a determining factor, but older people may be more likely to suffer post-concussion syndrome. Women receive the diagnosis more often than men, but some speculate that this is simply because a woman is more likely than a man to seek medical attention for the symptoms.

Post-concussion symptoms are much the same as the signs of a TBI. People typically experience headaches, although post-concussion headaches tend to mimic tension headaches or migraines. Changes in sleep patterns, anxiety and mood swings, fatigue, dizziness and sensory changes are common. A person may begin experiencing the issues during the first 10 days after the initial injury, and symptoms may last a year or longer, although they often improve or disappear within three months.

Because the cause of post-concussion syndrome is not known, you will not be able to take steps to prevent it after a TBI. Being aware of what to watch for and seeking medical attention may help you to manage the symptoms while your brain heals. More information about traumatic brain injuries is available on our webpage.